Blog, Farm

“First Year Garden Update: September 2021”

Our garden beds.

What We Planted:

  • Tomatoes plants 
  • Yellow Onions (bag of started, baby onions)
  • Pickling Cucumbers (planted from seed)
  • Garlic (cloves, not seeds)
  • Carrots (planted from seed and starts)
  • Lettuce (planted from starts, and seed)
  • Spinach (planted from seed)
  • Swiss Chard (planted from seed)
  • Strawberry plants
  • Bell Peppers plants
  • Cayenne Pepper plants
  • Jalapeno pepper plants

What Thrived vs What Didn’t:

Our lovely Tomatoes.

Our tomatoes did great! We have had a consistent small harvest every day which worked perfectly for our little family of three. I was even able to make a good amount of freezer pizza sauce! We planted the peppers next to the tomatoes and they had it rough with the weird heat waves, and I did not pinch them at first, at all, so we have got a few tiny bell peppers from it, but not really any useable ones, and the small rodents ate them before we could anyways. Unfortunately, the slugs took out the other pepper varieties earlier in the season as well, and they just never grew back, fully. So, sadly we didn’t get to use any spicy peppers.

our Peppers. Pinched all the newer buds off, hope it helps grow this little guy.

Our cucumbers never did too well either, we might have planted them at the wrong time. They had a very slow start, and produced very small fruits so I never got to do pickles this year, although it did grow a couple tiny ones. They also just looked yellow, and sickly. We planted the garlic pretty late in the summer, so we understand why that didn’t do too good. It was a quick decision, that we didn’t think too much about, we just had it lying around and planted it, as we had never done garlic before, but we should have done the research.

Our sad onions. They were deeper in dirt, but this was after I pulled and checked them.

We bought a bag of onions to put in a planting bin, they were the yellow onions and i’m not quite sure what type exactly, but they did not grow at all, sadly some just bolted asap, and others didn’t grow at all. We planted carrots from seed, and also planted “little finger” carrot starts, but none of them grew. I think it was because they did not have enough dirt to root down into and needed more room, potentially.

The Cucumbers. I didn’t even get to make a trellis, they never really grew. it only had just a couple tiny curled pickles.

The Strawberry plant, did great, at first! Then the heat wave came and slowed it down, with some burnt leaves. It then, grew a bunch of runners and I think that is why the fruit became so small and few, to none, as I did not clip the runners off. Our lettuce, we planted from seed— “black seeded” lettuce and we also got starts of “salad bowl” lettuce, those got eaten by slugs at first, but then after that, they grew back and did pretty okay. We were able to harvest some baby lettuce for a little bit! The spinach we planted grew, but it bolted asap, so we couldn’t use it. We also planted Swiss Chard, but once again, the slugs ate it. Unfortunately, we had to take out that whole bed due to a nest of Yellow jackets, so we don’t have pictures of the lettuce/spinach/chard and couldn’t replant any of them.

Our Strawberries. I pinched most of the runners, but should’ve sooner. We started with 2 plants.

Next Season’s Tactics:

For our Carrots, I will give them more dirt, to grow deep into, and try to thin them more properly, once they’re big enough. 

The Peppers, I will pinch them for the first 2-3 weeks so they grow and get a better root system going, before making any peppers, as well as try to watch how I water them.

For our Strawberries, I will pinch off the runners and focus on keeping it from trailing away so it does not use up it’s energy. 

The Cucumbers,  I will try to give them more fertilizer and maybe check them for bugs more frequently. They kept turning yellow and sickly, with curled little cucumbers, so I don’t know if it was bugs, or some kind of nitrogen or potassium deficiency. I will also pay attention to how much I water them.

For Our Garlic I will plant that at the correct time next season, early spring maybe this fall, and see how it goes.

We have this book, it has very helpful info!

The Lettuce did pretty good besides the slugs, and it needed a little bit more space, so I will prevent the slugs and give them more room next time! The Spinach I think just was effected by the extreme heat we had– it grew right before and bolted right after.

For our Onions I will start them by seed this year, and in the house at first, to see if that helps. Then I will plant them outside around our other plants as a sort of barrier, to see if they like that better. I’ve heard others say the bag of started onions, sometimes just bolt and stay small, which is what ours did.

Oh and I will also find a way to get rid of slugs, before it’s too late and my plants are gone. We will probably plant a few patches of French Marigolds here and there, to prevent our crops from being eaten and remove them from the general area. They are the worst during our rainy seasons, where we live!

What We Are Planting Next:

For reference, our garden zone is 8b. Click Here to see an informative planting calendar for this zone!

The List for our next Garden season (this coming spring):

  • Carrots (from seeds)
  • Onions (Green onions, and yellow onions; from seeds)
  • Lettuce (from seeds, and started plant)
  • Spinach (from seeds)
  • Swiss Chard (from seeds)
  • Zucchini  (from seeds)
  • Cucumbers (from seeds)
  • Corn (from seeds)
  • Strawberry plants (and seeds I saved from this year)
  • Garlic (from cloves)
  • Tomatoes plants (and seeds I saved from this year)
  • Bell Peppers plants (and Jalapeno peppers, just to try one more time without a green house).
On our book shelf. A great read also!

Herbs and Such:

  • Rosemary (from a start)
  • Basil (from a start)
  • Chives (from seeds)
  • Peppermint (from a start)
  • Comfrey (from a start)
  • Lemon Balm (from a start)
  • Lavender plants

All the herbs will be in pots or potting boxes, the cucumbers and corn will be along our fence, and the rest of the garden will be done in a Concrete block, raised bed type of garden.  I can’t wait to show that design, and what we plan to do! Currently, I am just planting in spring, and I stop around September, so I don’t deal with the fall/winter garden. Overall, for our first time we did pretty good, and i’m happy with the outcome! We still got to harvest things and use them in our meals, so it was great- even if half the garden didn’t do the best.

How was your Garden this year? Do you plant through the fall/winter?

Leave a comment! I’d love to hear how your garden is doing!

Blog, Evergreen Rabbitry

“Our Pallet Rabbit Hutch #2: How We Built it”

3 Sided Rabbit Hutch. 2 small sides with one, long breeder side, for a momma doe and her litters.

We are back at it again, this time a bit different! I mentioned in my last Rabbit Hutch post (linked) we would be doing a 4 sided hutch next. This time, however, we have decided to make it a 3 sided hutch, instead. Two sides being for our 2 breeder bucks, and one longer side for 1 of our breeder does. We have full walls to divide them for their own fully, separated spaces. We also personally use rabbit runs so that our Rabbits have more room to roam in the yard! This hutch design is still enough room for our breed of Standard Rex Rabbits, and even more roomy if you have a type of mini Rabbit breed! The smaller sides could be used to separate the baby doe/buck Rabbits, an still be close to the mother doe who is right next door, but we personally just use the two smaller sides for our bucks right now!

This hutch is the same general idea from last time, just a little simpler and smaller by a few inches. Same basic material list from before, just with a couple things changed, or taken off. My husband says this one is a much simpler design than the previous, although still similar, due to less brackets on the frame work part of things.

Here is our step-by-step guide, hope you can use it for your hutches! Also, this one cost about the same as last time, maybe even a little less because we already had leftover materials from other projects. So, it was around $200 total cost.

Materials:

  • 5-6 pallets. (We just used what leftovers we had from the other hutch build and also some scrap pieces of plywood and siding that we had around.)
  • 8 door hinges
  • 3 Door handles
  • 1 x 1/2″in wire mesh flooring *(know the size mesh flooring needed for the size of Rabbit breed you have. We have Standard Rex, but if you have a smaller breed, maybe look into a smaller mesh flooring, and/or maybe putting a flat lid in there for their feet to rest on. occasionally).
  • You can use the same mesh for the doors as well, but we used different smaller mesh wiring for that.
  • 4 locks of any kind (we used a 2 1/2″ inch barrel bolt lock for main doors and a 1″ or .5″ smaller for the small side door).
  • 3″ inch mending plates, 4 for each door (we also had extras from last time, so you may see two different ones in the pictures).
  • vinyl roofing ( 3 sheets of 8′ roofing)
  • box of 1 1/2″ in nails
  • box of 4″in screws
  • box of staples (to staple wire flooring down)
  • box of 2″ Wood tight screws.
  • Optional: paint, and primer.

Step 1:

For the beginning obviously its to start the frame, the height for this Frame was about 2′ off the ground and roughly 2′ for inside height. Attach the legs to the sides of the bottom/floor frame. Place a beam in the middle for stability, and a beam on top, in the front that will later be used in regards to the roofing. Then place those two side beams on top, (both sides) for the roofing as well.

Picture for step 1.

As always, please remember not to paint the inside of hutch. Rabbits will chew on the wood and would be at risk of ingesting the paint, so try to be careful when painting the  outside! Also make sure no staples, or pointed wiring is going to poke them or be loose enough to be found and eaten. Rabbits *can* eat anything, even if it isn’t good for them!

Step 2:

Next it is painting the frame, and placing divider walls. This one was just custom fit with a couple trimmings done, so that it was a tight fit. Those measurements were; Height: 1.5′ and in length about 4′ this is rough estimate. That little wall divider was about 19″ x 23″in. Before putting those wall dividers up, staple down that wire flooring! Also, we now have cut and placed the 3 pieces of plywood across the top for the roofing. Roughly, the sizes were, 5.5″ x 3′.

Picture for step 2.
Picture for step 2.

Step 3:

Now we place the outside walls. Sizes for back wall, were a little over 2′ x 3.5 ft. Sizes for front wall was 2′ x 21″ and side wall that’s boarded has about 28″in boards. Notice, we are still using that temporary bottom board to keep the walls looking straight.

We like the glass bottles, so far! although we have the plastic ones, as well. The glass makes it easy to see if water is dirty!
Picture for step 3.
Picture for Step 3.

Step 4:

This step is solely for painting, paint all of the outside, next after this will be making and painting doors before being put on hutch as well as attaching the roofing.

Picture for Step 4.
Picture for Step 4.
We use these kind of pellet feeders as well! They work great for us!

Step 5:

Now for the doors, there will be three, the two side doors are both, 23″ x 20″ and the front smaller door, is about 14.5 x 22″. Hammer the plates on each corner from and back, paint them and hinge them to the hutch, with their handles. Attach the roof. We cut our roofing to about 66″ long overhanging about 3-3.5″ inches. Once we applied the roof, there is a gap in the front between that and the door frame. attach a piece of wood to cover that gap or you could even put smaller wire across it, if you wanted. We put a board. Now, once doors are done and painted staple some wire (mesh, or you need something sturdier than chicken wire) onto the doors and if needed, cut out the holes for water bottle and/or pellet feeder.

The next and almost final step is the side door for the breeder side of this hutch, the sizing for that is 10″ x 12″ in door. No pictures for that yet, because we aren’t breeding our other doe quite yet. But, it is the exact same style and size as the other hutch’s side doors, if you need pictures and for that! (that one is linked in the top of this post). Mark where you want it cut it out and screw on 2 pieces of wood on the back to hold those boards together, and attach hinges and lock. If you used plywood for this side wall, the back stabilizer boards are really not needed, since it’s all one piece. *You may have to touch up the paint a bit on small side door, due to cutting it out, it may scratch the paint, a tad.

Picture for Step 5. No front board, yet. That was done after.

Step 6: Finishing Hutch!

Our yard is not level, so we had these temporary boards underneath them to build it on level ground.
Newest addition, next to our first build! (2 sided breeder Rabbit hutch)

Now we are finished with this 3 sided Rabbit hutch! Like stated with the last couple pictures, we are waiting to remove the temporary leveling boards under the legs, until we deconstruct our straw bale garden beds. We will use that dirt and straw to level out the ground underneath these hutches, this new one is on part of the most sloped area of our yard, so once we deconstruct our beds, the temporary boards will be gone! Now that it is September, we will be doing that very soon!

This hutch is really sturdy. Whether you paint it, or just use a clear coat to protect the wood, it looks so fresh! I’m thinking both of these hutches will last us a good long while, before we have to build new ones or even fix them up! I’ll give an update in a few years!

Next up for our DIY projects, is a chicken coop! That one will be fun, because it will be with a shipping container my husband got from his work’s scrap pile. Anyways, that will come soon, so keep an eye out for that post as well! Can’t wait to have our own chickens again, and grab eggs from our backyard!

Blog, Farm

“Farm Dogs: LGD vs Herding Breeds”

My old boy, Doc. He was an amazing example of the Aussie breed.

I had to bring up the farm dog topic considering dogs have been a big part of my life, and eventually will be a big part in the protection of our future farm (and family). There are two main types of farm dogs. LGD breeds (Livestock Guardian Dog) and Herding dog breeds. My husband has never really had either type, but I have grown up around Australian Shepherds, my whole life. They are a herding breed. We will be getting an LGD soon, and I can’t wait! Training dogs has always been something I enjoy doing, so I love to get experience with different kinds.

Herding Breeds:

My family has always been an “Aussie only” kind of family. Very biased, but who could blame them, they are an intelligent breed! Usually once people find a breed they like, they don’t switch, at least not for a long while. Australian Shepherd’s are one of many herding dogs bred and genetically driven to herd, just about anything on your farm. My old Aussie, would herd me when we ran around the back yard! There are Heelers, Collies, Corgi’s and many other kinds too, that are in this “Herding dog” category. They were all designed to help “round up” your herd, whatever that herd may be and if they have the chance to do so. All of them are intelligent, loyal, hard-working breeds, who are quick to learn and bred to guide the herd to a certain destination, or to keep them in a certain area. However, there is a significant difference between herding dogs, and Livestock Guardian dogs. 

On my List, to read next!

LGD Breeds:

Livestock Guardian dogs are another breed of “farm dog” if you will, that are bred for the farm life. Livestock dogs consist of many breeds. Popular ones are, Great Pyrenees, Sheepdogs, Maremma, and Anatolian Shepherds. Of course there are plenty others, just like with herding breeds, but these are most common. These breeds are similar; loyal, hard-working, smart, quick learners, and intelligent. However, they were made to be the sole protection. A barrier between herd and predator.

I think the main difference with these dogs is, they are meant to bond solely to the herd/flock or whatever animal its protecting and not to you, the human. While they are meant to obey and listen to you of course, they are meant to be out in the barn, not in the house on the dog bed. This type of breed thrives being bonded to it’s job, (a herd or flock). Where as an Aussie for example, thrives being bonded to the human first, who then gives it a job.

(Herding breed) Aussie to the left. To the right, (LGD breed) some type of Pyrenees/Maremma mix.

The Difference:

Herding breeds are driven to herd, corral, and to guide the other animals (or the children) on the farm. Where as Livestock Dogs, are bred to protect the animals of the farm. They are the watchers, the loyal lookouts. That is their job, not to corral the farm, but to save the farm from things that prey on the outskirts. Aussie’s and other herding breeds can be protective, my Dad’s Aussie does great at protecting him! However, there are other breeds better suited to do so, and better suited for that type of training. It’s not impossible, but it is more difficult to train a dog for something it wasn’t truly designed or driven to do in the first place. 

Personally, my husband and I both have not had our own LGD before, we’ve only been around other people’s. We will be getting one though, to protect our farm once it gets a little bigger. Our animals will need a protecter, and something that will help to deter predators. I love Aussie’s and in fact I have loved training them and being around them throughout my childhood but they, as well as other herding breeds, were never designed to be doing the work of protecting, full time. It’s not what they’re driven or bred to do. I also can’t have a dog that would rather be inside with us, instead of in with the barn animals. If you too have had Aussies, you know they are “velcro” dogs! LGD are herd first, people second kind of dogs. They still like you, but they love their herd/flock.

Also, on my list. Can’t wait to read it!

The LGD We Want:

We will be getting a Karakachan dog when the time comes. They are hard to find, especially in our area! but we stumbled across a breeder, and it seems to be just what we are looking for in a farm dog. Loyal, smart, hard-working, protective, quick learners, and good with kids. That was the main thing. We’ve read and researched about them all (one of the helpful things about the internet!) and we can’t wait to start working with an LGD Breed, and just learn more about them with all the day-to-day experience on our own.

I think a lot of people get nervous about LGD’s when starting out, because they are marked as “severely stubborn.” I think this mainly comes from the fact that they are the “boss” of the herd, they are independently driven to do their job, on their own without your help. If you come into it with no training and no one to help, then that smart, quick dog has a risk of learning bad habits and being stubborn, in a bad way. That is where we need to step in to guide, take preventative action, and to train them properly. Any smart dog can learn bad habits! I believe that it takes the correct training, and any helping hands who have the experience, as well. Don’t be scared to try owning a different breed, just because you haven’t before. As long as you prepare for that dogs needs and such, why not?

I have had a good amount of experience with dogs, and even hope to eventually do puppy training in the far future, but still every dog breed is different and it takes different techniques, and different training for breeds who have different drives! So I’m eager to train an LGD and learn more. I love researching different dog breeds, partially because I’ve worked with Aussies so much that now, it is time for a change! I also just enjoy training dogs. 

Next up on the “Dogs to Get” list that I have going, is a German Shepherd (for our protection, not the farms). Tell me, do you have a Karakachan, or other LGD? Leave a comment, I’d love to hear your family’s experience with them!

Blog, Evergreen Rabbitry

“How We Built Our Pallet Rabbit Hutch, and What it Cost.”

Forest, the Keeper of the Rabbits.

I really don’t remember quite how we got to starting a Rabbitry, all I know is my husband wanted to get our little one some rabbits, and here we are starting a Rabbitry! We researched quite a lot about building our own hutches for the rabbits and we had access to a lot of pallets. So, we found a pallet hutch design and went from there! This hutch has 2 sides, so it will be nice and roomy for each of our breeder does (girl rabbits) litters and, nest boxes. 

Material list:  

  • 5-6 Pallets (try to get the bigger ones, with wider boards. You might have extra boards when finished).
  • Two 2’x4′ ft pieces of Plywood
  • 8 Hinges
  • 4 locks any kind you want. (We used a 2 1/2″ inch barrel bolt lock).
  • 2 door handles
  • 12 Corner braces, L shaped brackets two to go in each of the frames base corners
  • 16 Tie Plate Bracket pieces
  • Roofing (we used a vinyl kind. It’s lightweight and doesn’t get as hot as metal roofing).
  • 1 1/2″ inch Nails
  • 4″ inch Screws
  • a box of Staples (to staple wire).
  • 1×1/2″ inch Mesh wire
  • Some Chicken wire
  • extra sand paper (for sanding boards)

Optional:

  • Paint
  • Tools to paint

The total cost with all these supplies came out to about $200, without the paint. With the paint (and we got primer) it would be about $250.

Step One: Deconstruct Pallets and Build Frame

First, the pallets need to be deconstructed, and we sanded ours down a little bit. You don’t have to if you have nice pallets, but it did help with the fairly scratchy pallets we had. Then we organized which wood pieces would be going to what part of the hutch and started building the frame. The sizes for our frame were; W 50″in x L 47.5″in the height on the inside of the actual enclosure was approx. 24″ at the back wall w/ an added 5″ at the front wall, (rough estimate). In front sides of the frame are set up to create a corner for the leg posts to sit in. Notice those corners in the picture. Make sure to put a center beam in the middle for that extra stability, and to staple your floor wire to something. Also, attach all the frames base, corner braces onto the inside of the frame.

The Frames Base/floor. Notice the corners and legs position.

Step Two: First Roofing Attachments

Next, attach a beam to the top two sides for the roofing, and then lay down three sheets of plywood about 8″ inch x 4′ foot in sizing for it to be secured to, and for stability as well. 

Put a beam on each side for roof stabilization. Also, notice all the corner braces, placement.
Lay sheets of the plywood across, for roof.

Step Three: Paint Frame and Flooring

Now that the frame and first roofing pieces are on, put the first part of the door frame up, that front middle beam. Put back middle beam up too, that will be for the back wall pieces. We recommend painting the frame now, while it is bare. Make sure that you do not get any paint on the inside where rabbits will be, because they nibble on the wood, and it is not good for them to digest the paint. Now, attach the floor wire by stapling it down.  After the floor wire is attached, put a board across the top center beam to cover the staples. That makes it looking a bit cleaner. 

Painted frame, and flooring pieces in.

Step Four: Divider Wall and Gap

For the wall divider, the size was about 48″ in  We marked where to cut for the bottom center beam, and took that piece out so it slid in, with a snug fit without nailing it in place. There is a gap at the top, between the wall and the roof. You will need to staple chicken wire over that gap (or any small enough wire) so that the rabbits cannot jump into each other’s side.

The added wall divider.

Step Five: Putting up Walls

To get a nice clean bottom edge we nailed a temporary board across the bottom of each side while working on the walls. After doing that we measured, cut and nailed in the boards. We used 4 nails each board, and the sizes of the boards were roughly; back boards 26″ in, side boards 25.5-29″ inches. At the corner of each wall was the roofing beam that stuck out so we marked the last board and cut out a notch to fit that last board in.

Back wall boards up. See temporary bottom edge board.
Great book! I have a copy as well!

Step Six: Some Front door attachments and Roof

Attach the roof. We used 3 sheets of vinyl. We had ours overhang on the back by 8″in and in the front approx. 10″ inches. Now that the three walls are up and the roof is on, move the temporary board to the front to help align your door frames and paint all the walls.  We added along the sides, another board so that our door locks would be flush with the door and be able to open/close properly, However it might not need that depending on the lock style used. We also added a board at the top in between door frame and roof to try and even that out as well.

Painted walls, and temporary front board is up.
Showing the roof. It was after this picture, that the top board (between roof and door frame), and two side boards for the door was added.

Step Seven: Side doors

We added the side doors because it would be a hassle for me to reach in to grab a rabbit or kit in the very back, especially if there is a protective mother doe. Its about a 10×12″ inch door. Big enough to get a full grown rabbit out of, but no bigger. Mark where you want the door with a sharpie and cut it out. After cutting that out, the wood boards will need to be nailed to 2 back boards, shown below, so that they stay together.

Top left; outline of door. Top right; cut out. Bottom pictures; finished side door

Step Eight: Front doors

Now we have the front doors. Ours were approx. 20″x22.75″ inches . Once we hammered the 8 tie plate pieces into the four sides of the frame boards (back and front), we painted the doors, (no paint on the inside). We marked where we wanted our hinges and door handle and screwed those in. Now staple the mesh wire to the inside of the door, and try to get rid of any excess wire. If you are using a wall pellet feeder, you can just do a quick cut out for that in the door’s wire as well.

Front doors painted, and attached.

Now find a place for your new rabbit hutch and enjoy!

Part 2, for the 4 sided Rabbit hutch, coming soon!

Finished two sided Rabbit Hutch.

Blog, Evergreen Rabbitry

Introducing Our Rabbits, and Our “Evergreen Rabbitry.”

Cottontail

Hey there! So let’s jump right in to why we started a Rabbitry. First off, let it be known that I was the one who did not like the idea of getting Rabbits. My husband wanted a Rabbit for our little one, but I thought Rabbits would be pointless. However, I came across two facts. One being that they have great droppings for garden fertilizer, and the second, is that they are actually a great meat source as well! The breed that we got is multi-purposeful. It’s the Standard Rex breed. This breed you can even use their pelts because they are so velvety soft. So with being kind of cute to look at in your yard and now having a purpose, we decided why not get some, and why not breed them for others to enjoy as well?

There are actually two Rex breeds, Standard and Mini. We chose Standard mainly because they are a bit bigger being between 7.5 – 10.5 pounds (12” in length) where as the mini’s are only 3 – 4.5 pounds (10” in length). We’ve never had Rabbits before and are having so much fun with them so far! Four will be our breeder Rabbits, three of which are shown below. So far, we have the two does (female Rabbits) and one buck (male Rabbit) with one buck on the way (around September, so excited to get him!). These Rabbits won’t be our meat source, that will be later in the future with the offspring, so we are still preparing for that. Currently, we are just using them as our garden fertilizers and friends to our little one to enjoy! 

The name is “Evergreen Rabbitry,” because one, we love our home in the Evergreen state of Washington (hence this blog’s name), and two that name will eventually tie into the name of our (future) farm.

Our Rabbits:

When we do breed them if not this Fall, this coming Spring, we are hoping to send good and healthy, little Rabbits to families who will enjoy them as either a 4-H friend, a meat source, a pet, or even just a garden fertilizer! These Rabbits have so many options it seems like, and that’s why when choosing a breed, we chose this one. I also heard that this Rex breed is the most “cat like.” So, there is a random fun-fact for you. I am looking forward to writing about the whole breeding process with them, so keep a look out for that in the future!

Blackie, Mopsy, Cottontail

 Animal Stewardship, and Young children:

We wanted to start doing animals while we grow our family, and while our little Beatrice is young because we are big advocates of helping our children understand that while animals are cute and friendly, God has given them all a purpose. To teach them that we take care of, and respect the animals that the Lord has provided for us to use as food for the table. It is a true blessing, to be a steward of the earth.

Great book for the beginning!

Rabbit Care:

We have researched quite a lot, because we wanted to make sure that any animal we have never had experience with, would be well taken care of when we did become the owners. Luckily, rabbits in general are pretty low maintenance, and easy to take care of. They also don’t need a ton of space! That’s another reason why we decided on rabbits for our next animal. It’s a smaller space in our backyard, so we can do the Rabbits with no problems! We definitely didn’t want to get an animal who would not enjoy life in a smaller space at first. Also, with the gardening we are doing now they can, and will eat any cuts or clippings you don’t want to eat yourself! Beside’s a couple of things, they can eat just about anything in the garden (in moderation of course). I’ll make another post later, about what to feed them!

Rabbitry Info:

We might have one or two more Does later on, but I’ve heard often that It’s easy to find yourself with more rabbits than wanted. So, I’m keeping us limited to just the four breeders right now (two does, two bucks). With the two Does hopefully being bred 2-3 times a year, that will be plenty enough rabbits to have and give to other families!

I post about the Rabbitry on here, but if you are near the Key Peninsula area of Western Washington, and would like one, or a couple Rex Rabbits, head on over to our Rabbitry Facebook page “Evergreen Rabbitry” for further details and updates on the litters. You can also contact me through this blog, or any other social media! (all links at the bottom of this web page).

Purely for your enjoyment. Blackie in the Rabbit run, chilling.